A Registered Charity (No. 818/056/57) with Government of Nepal

Climate Change: Effects on Himalayan communities and biodiversity

Climate change is emerging as the biggest threat to human and wildlife communities. The temperature of the earth is rising because of the release of greenhouse gasses, mainly by developed countries. Although Himalayan communities have contributed very little to the rise of the earth’s temperature, we will be the among the first to suffer from the consequences. As the effects are at a global scale we must seek ways to mitigate the threats and adapt our living styles to minimize the threats to human communities and natural ecosystems. We are monitoring changes in ecosystems via some key indicator species and are committed to find solutions that could be applicable at the field level.

 Our contribution
Himalayan Nature staff act responsibly on making their contribution to reduce global warming.

Himalayan Nature staff act responsibly on making their contribution to reduce global warming and to conserve energy and natural resources.
1. Toilet flush adjusted for minimal use of water.
2. No use of air conditioning at office and home, instead dress properly to match the climate.
3. Use of fuel efficient vehicles/bikes.
4. Power saving options and minimal use of electricity at home and in the office. Switch off power when not in need.
5. Proper disposal of waste including batteries.
6. Recycle materials including bags, envelopes and paper.
7. Eat organic food as far as possible, stop use of persistent organochemicals.
8. Grow trees in private land, with communities on state-owned land and help others to plant trees.
9. Conduct education and awareness activities on optimal use of power and resources including during one-to-one conversation.
Please join us to save our fragile mountain environment. Himalayas are unique and there is only one on this earth.


Climate change and response by amphibians
Amphibian populations are declining across the world at an alarming rate due to several threats such as habitat loss, overexploitation, and introduction of exotic species.

Amphibian populations are declining across the world at an alarming rate because of habitat loss, overexploitation, the introduction of exotic species, infectious diseases, environmental pollution, and climate change. To date there are limited data on the impact of climate change on Nepalese amphibian populations. The global climate change might have direct and indirect effects on worldwide amphibian declines. It might affect the breeding phenology of amphibians. Amphibians might respond differently towards changing climate; some populations may breed earlier but not all species may do so.

Therefore, we aim to analyze patterns of amphibian species composition and their response to global climate change in the Nepalese Himalaya.